Students at the University of St. Andrews have voted over three to one in favour of keeping their Students’ Association unaffiliated to the National Union of Students (NUS).

After two weeks of campaigning and three days of voting, the results were announced yesterday evening with 73.9% of students voting no against the proposed affiliation with the national body.

With a impressively high voter turnout of 26% Freddie Fforde – St. Andrews Union President – congratulated both teams for their “spirited and informed campaigns”. The result, however, meant 1763 of 2385 students had voted ‘no’, leaving only 590 supporting the decision with another 32 spoiling their ballot paper. St Andrews Students’ Association therefore remains independent.

This news comes at a time when the University of Southampton itself is amidst campaigning for and against affiliation to the NUS with an upcoming referendum on the decision in less than three weeks; on December 6th.

Indeed, despite its geographically distance, the results of St. Andrews’ referendum is seen somewhat as a bellwether by Southampton students and the campaign teams.

With St. Andrews remaining amongst the last few unaffiliated universities, the result is an indicator that the organisation has failed to justify that there has been a recent substantial changes in the NUS and Higher Education as a whole to make the body worth affiliating with.

Nonetheless, it remains only a snippet of importance in regards to SUSU’s referendum with its own independence at stake as well as a variety of different issues.

In the run-up to Southampton’s NUS referendum, the Wessex Scene will be reporting on many other Universities’ NUS journeys; both past and present, so remember to check back for more news. 

SUSU’s referendum will take place on 6th December.

More articles in NUS Referendum 2012
  1. An Assault on Democracy? – a Response
  2. SUSU Announce Date For Forthcoming NUS Referendum
  3. An Assault On Democracy? – Sabbs & Their NUS Plans
  4. University of Surrey Students’ Union Keeps NUS Affiliation
  5. Q&A with NUS President Liam Burns at Campus This Evening
  6. Q&A With NUS President Liam Burns – Live Blog
  7. ‘No’ NUS Affiliation For St Andrews Students’ Association
  8. NUS Who?
  9. Debates, votes and results: An NUS Referendum Timetable
  10. Say No To NUS
  11. Say Yes To NUS
  12. The Cost of NUS affiliation – A Quick Glance at the Auditor’s Report
  13. The International Arguments About NUS
  14. Crunching the Numbers on the NUS
  15. NUS Apocalypse
  16. Students Vote To Keep SUSU Out Of NUS
  17. NUS Apocalypse Part 2: Referendageddon

4 Comments »

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  • Sasha
    avatar

    “With St. Andrews remaining amongst the last few unaffiliated universities, the result is an indicator that the organisation has failed to justify that there has been a recent substantial changes in the NUS and Higher Education as a whole to make the body worth affiliating with.”

    that’s quite a loaded statement – its slightly different in Scotland – St Andrews has a much larger say with the Scottish Parliament that we do with the UK one, as well as having a strong Scottish Universities network outside of NUS that doesn’t exist in England, plus tuition fees not being an issue in Scotland doesn’t help.

    That will sound almost predictable, coming from me, but even objectively, it’s worth noting the differences of situations that St Andrews and Southampton find themselves in – distance not being the only factor.

    Reply

    Alexander James Green
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    Hi Sasha.
    Sorry if it sounds too loaded. I realise the situation is different, especially as St Andrews is in Scotland which has a different political and higher education set-up.

    I was merely trying to make the point, as you said before, that the St. Andrews referendum was an interesting prelude to our own one – especially as they remain one of the few unaffiliated like us – and that clearly there, they had failed to convince the students it was worth joining.

    Reply

    Sasha
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    no that’s fine, it is an interesting prelude and its a fair point you make, although maybe the whole of St Andrews voted no because of the No Platform policy, rather than not being convinced of substantial changes – I think the assumption is the bit I think is loaded, not the actual point about the interest. Just thought I’d add it to give a bit of perspective that I thought was maybe missing from the paragraph.

    Reply

    Ugh
    avatar

    Please, please just go back to work for fucksake.

    Reply