Criticism of Women's Day Poster Spans the Web

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Many of you have read two posts on WessexBlog about the Union’s Women’s Day poster. In fact, it has become the most talked about issue the blog has covered, with several of you commenting with your views and opinions.

President of the student union, Steve O’Reilly, responded to criticism saying:

Over sexualised? Are you kidding me? This is completely frought with over-analysis and when you over-analyse you can draw whatever conclusion you like, which you have done. This is hardly even a debate.

Sophie Paterson, VP Welfare and Societies, later issued an apology that we published last week. She wrote that:

It is important to note that traditionally both SUSU events have focused around health and wellbeing rather than the social, political or historical aspects of the female experience. This is reflected in the correlation with Men’s day, if we were focusing on culture and feminism particularly then it might be inappropriate to have a men’s day, however on the subject of health and wellbeing there are many issues which affect either men or women and thus it makes sense for the binary format, and to hold separate days for each sex.

However Gwen Sharp, Assistant Professor of Sociology in Nevada State College, responded to this on Sociological Images, explaining that:

The implication is that men’s issues and feminism are unconnected, and that if you want to highlight feminism, focusing on men in any way undermines your purpose. Given that I believe there’s no way to discuss gender without looking at the social constructions of both masculinity and femininity, that men can certainly be feminists, and that gender inequality hurts women and men, I found that statement jarring.

The debate and discussion continues, far further than Highfield Campus. Visit Sociological Images to read more.

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Discussion4 Comments

  1. avatar

    Putting aside the issue about the sexualisation, is it not more worrying that out of the activities chosen to be advertised, sweets made it into the top 5?

  2. avatar

    In my personal opinion, it was a poster to advertise an event. Not a commentary on socio-gender-political issues. I hope that clears it up for everyone.

    Lucy Austen
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    By playing on socio-gender stereotypes, it becomes a commentary.

    I hope that clears that up for you.

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