A Very British Premiere

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Southampton University was host to one of the most relaxed media events imaginable in the warm sunshine of last night.

Most premieres consist of loud music from the movie soundtrack, screams for autographs and pushy photographers yelling for the gaze of the celebrities. But whilst The Disappearance of Alice Creed arrived to a reasonable number of fans onlookers, there was barely a shout.

Lead actress Gemma Arterton happily posed for the cameras and gave interviews whilst the crowd – mainly students – smiled at the occasion and perhaps the oddity of having a red carpet run past Stags. It wasn’t long until those with tickets for the screening strolled into the Union in their colourful suits and dresses.

After champagne had been quaffed, the excited audience settled down in the cinema and listened to a few words from the team who made the film. “Having done Film at University, I’m really pleased a student organization won the competition” said J Blakeson, the director. “This is really close to my heart.”

The movie itself was received extremely well in a great atmosphere. Whilst plot details cannot be given away, the hostage scenario was gasped at, screamed at and even nervously laughed at during clinical points. The film prides itself on having many big twists, and they appeared to be enjoyed by the students.

Afterwards, the Wessex Scene asked audience members what they had thought. The reaction was generally positive though no-one appeared stunned by the film. It was increasingly apparent that the most apt review was “Yeah, it was quite good.” From this reaction, Alice Creed looks unlikely to become a worldwide phenomenon, but it was warmly appreciated by most.

And that is probably the best way to sum up the whole evening. Whilst Leicester Square should not worry too much about losing its premiere-hosting supremacy, Southampton University showed how the job can be done efficiently and without too much frenzied ego-inflation. It was a very British night of Hollywood.

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Mike is the Editor of the Wessex Scene for 2011/2012 after fulfilling the role of Features Editor in 2010/2011. Apart from taking charge of the ever-expanding Scene, Mike enjoys writing for a broad range of the sections, though his heart truly lies in reporting and Features.

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