The World’s Least Visited Countries: Part 3

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This is my third and final installment of The World’s Least Visited Countries. With any hope, through this series, I’ve brought to light some of the more neglected tourist destinations around the world, which will make adventurous travellers want to defy the odds and visit some of these underrated countries. 

Brunei, Asia

This is a small but wealthy nation in Asia, almost an enclave of Malaysia. Brunei offers great sightseeing opportunities by way of Islamic architecture and the Ulu Temburong National Park.

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Why the low visitors?

Very severe penalties for crimes considered petty in many other countries and to non-Muslims may scare off visitors from visiting Brunei.

Tuvalu, Oceania 

Tuvalu is an island nation in the Pacific, embellished by spotless palm tree punctuated beaches. It is modest in its offerings to tourists by way of city comforts or hills and mountain ranges, instead, the people of Tuvalu are said to be the island nation’s greatest asset as they are said to be very welcoming and friendly.

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Why the low visitors?

This is a tiny island that is predicted to all but disappear, should sea levels rise high enough. It is difficult to get to, as it requires taking an expensive flight from Fiji, which only runs twice a week and is said to be wildly unreliable. It also does not offer many sightseeing opportunities.

Anguilla, The Caribbean

The picture perfect British Overseas Territory of Anguilla in the Caribbean offers luscious natural scenery, free from the annoyance of hordes of tourists.

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Why the low visitors?

Anguilla is an expensive destination, and since you are spoiled for choice for destinations on the Caribbean, this costly island is overlooked by tourists. Furthermore, it is difficult to access so it tends to be a celebrity and rich American visitor hotspot.

Comoros, Africa

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You can thank the island nation of Comoros for that new ylang-ylang air freshener you bought. They are the world’s largest manufacturer of the ylang-ylang flower (from the cananga tree). Refreshing perfume exports aside, The Comoros offer great opportunities for diving and sailing and also have colourful market towns in Moroni.

Why the low visitors?

Unfortunately, this island nation is subject to frequent coups; it has experienced around 20 since it gained independence from France in 1975. It has unreliable and underdeveloped transportation systems, and strict adherence to Muslim traditions does not necessarily attract the bikini-clad and alcohol-desiring tourist.

Sierra Leone, Africa

The beautiful West African country boasts untainted beaches, mangrove forests, colourful buildings and national parks, and is temperate all year round.

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Why the low visitors?

The Ebola outbreaks in recent years have deterred tourists from visiting Sierra Leone. It is also very difficult to get anywhere from the airport itself; one must rely on choppy waters to get to the capital Freetown so is not ideal for anyone who gets motion sickness.

Kuwait, Middle East

A desert country neighboured by Iraq and Saudi Arabia, Kuwait offers an authentically Arabian experience of the Gulf. It has museums and souks as well as many beaches.

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Why the low visitors?

One of the least visited countries in the Middle East. It is perhaps shadowed by the allure of Dubai and Abu Dhabi to tourists. It has fewer facilities for tourists and expats comparatively, and the people are rumored to be unfriendly…

Read Part 1 and Part 2 for the other contenders for the least visited countries in the world. After carefully considering the exact reasons behind the unpopularity of these countries, maybe you could plan a trip to one of them instead of taking the more conventional approach to holidaying…

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Sub-editor 2017/18. Third year Biology with Linguistics student. Interested particularly in global health, genetics and nutrition. Very disposed towards writing about things that haven't quite been explained yet.

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